Inclusive SA

Inclusive SA (State Disability Inclusion Plan) Annual Report 2020–2021

Inclusive SA (State Disability Inclusion Plan) Annual Report 2020–2021

The Inclusive SA Annual Report 2020–21 provides an update on the progress of Inclusive SA actions and South Australian agencies and local councils individual Disability Access and Inclusion Plans (DAIPs), that aim to improve access and inclusion for people living with disability in South Australia.

Government of South Australia agencies and local councils have made significant progress in 2020–21 with 75 per cent of actions well underway, contributing to the vision of an accessible and inclusive South Australia, based on fairness and respect.

Key achievements throughout 2020–2021

  • State Government agencies and local council DAIPs committed to over 2,800 actions
  • DHS delivered four accessible and inclusive toolkits, to support and drive actions that deliver the economic and social benefits of a more inclusive state.
  • Expansion of accessible visitor experiences, including Goondooloo Ridge walk, Deep Creek Conservation Park and the Fremont Park all-abilities play space.
  • Development of a set of principles that support priority populations: Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander people, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, women and children.

Read the report online or download a copy

Read the report online

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Acknowledgement of Country

Acknowledgement of Country

The South Australian Government acknowledges and respects Aboriginal people as the State’s first people and recognises their traditional relationship with Country.

We acknowledge that the spiritual, social, cultural and economic practices of Aboriginal people come from their traditional lands and waters, and that the cultural and heritage beliefs, languages and laws are still of importance today.

Chief Executive's message

Chief Executive's message

The Government of South Australia recognises that access and inclusion is a fundamental right for all people, and together we are committed to delivering the economic and social benefits of a more inclusive South Australia.

The Disability Inclusion Act 2018 (SA) was passed by the 54th Parliament of South Australia, and commenced 1 July 2018. The legislation signalled the government’s commitment to create a more inclusive South Australia.

Access and inclusion is everyone’s business and everyone’s responsibility. Since the launch of Inclusive SA: South Australia’s first State Disability Inclusion Plan, Government of South Australia agencies and local councils have made significant progress in achieving the vision of an accessible and inclusive South Australia, based on fairness and respect.

Although COVID-19 has presented ongoing challenges in 2021, addressing access and inclusion for people living with disability continues to be a top priority for State Government agencies and local councils. Their commitment to delivering the actions outlined in both Inclusive SA and their individual Disability Access and Inclusion Plans (DAIPs) has resulted in significant progress and outcomes for people living with disability and I congratulate all involved for their ongoing commitment and dedication.

Inclusive SA is approaching its third year and I am pleased to report that 75% of actions are now well underway. In addition, State authority DAIPs have concluded their first year of operation and are actively being implemented to deliver tangible on-the-ground solutions.

Key achievements in the past 12 months include

  • State Government agencies and local council DAIPs committing to over 2,800 actions to deliver a whole-of-government approach to improve access and inclusion for all South Australians.
  • releasing four accessible and inclusive toolkits, which provide practical support to help drive positive actions that deliver the economic and social benefits of a more inclusive state.
  • expanding the Department for Environment and Water visitor experiences to be more accessible for people living with disability. The new Goondooloo Ridge walk and picnic area provides an opportunity for people living with disability to enjoy Deep Creek Conservation Park and take in the amazing view of Kangaroo Island.
  • opening the Fremont Park all-abilities play space, which features the City of Playford’s first Changing Places public toilet and many inclusive design features, including an all-abilities flying fox, liberty swing, sensory, music and nature play and a communication board.
  • developing a set of principles that support State authorities to improve access and inclusion for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, women and children.

The launch of Australia’s Disability Strategy 2021–2031 in December 2021 presents new and exciting opportunities that will require a whole-of-government approach and strong leadership. I look forward to delivering against this important strategy through Inclusive SA and State authority DAIPs and seeing the benefits for people living with disability.

Lois Boswell
Chief Executive for the Department of Human Services

Introduction

Introduction

The Disability Inclusion Act 2018 (SA) (the Act) was passed in 2018 to strengthen the Government of South Australia’s commitment to improving access and inclusion for people living with disability.

Inclusive SA is a cross-government initiative with 99 legislated State Government agencies and local councils (State authorities) leading specific Inclusive SA actions and their own DAIPs, to provide quality access and inclusion improvements within localised areas.

Inclusive SA and DAIP actions support the implementation of both the Act and Australia’s Disability Strategy 2021–2031, along with the principles agreed in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

For South Australian communities to prosper, we must support people living with disability to achieve a good life. Inclusive SA reflects and draws on the consultation that occurred during the development of the plan and we are committed to meaningful consultation with State Government agencies, local councils, people living with disability and relevant organisations and advocates to ensure the themes, priorities and actions of Inclusive SA drive positive change.

Inclusive SA brings to the forefront considerations that reduce the barriers for people living with disability. State authorities have identified actions to improve access and inclusion for people living with disability via their DAIPs, thus creating a blueprint for change.

The Department of Human Services (DHS) continues to lead the implementation of Inclusive SA by maintaining a cross-government community of practice. In 2021, DHS listened to people with lived experience of disability through consultations with the four priority groups identified in the Act: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, women and children.

This has led to a set of principles to guide and inform State authorities agencies and local councils to address the identified issues and barriers for these priority groups.

The Inclusive SA plan will be revised to come into alignment with Australia’s Disability Strategy and reflect the shifting priorities of people living with disability in South Australia.

This annual report provides an overview of Inclusive SA and a snapshot of the progress of Inclusive SA actions undertaken by State authorities over the past twelve months, including significant achievements.

Throughout the report, case studies are presented that showcase innovation and best practice examples of how State authorities have met and expanded on their commitment to Inclusive SA through their DAIPs and related actions.

This year’s annual report:

  • provides an update on the progress of the 39 actions in Inclusive SA during 2020–21
  • presents highlights and showcases the achievements from State authorities through DAIPs
  • outlines plans, goals and new initiatives for 2021–22.

Vision

Vision

Our vision is an accessible and inclusive South Australia based on fairness and respect.

To achieve this vision, Inclusive SA focuses on four themes and connected priorities that reflect what people living with disability have told us is important to them:

DHS will continue to embed the vision of Inclusive SA and continue to lead the implementation by strengthening State authorities’ understanding of priority groups.

The four priority groups as identified in the Act, and below, will be the foundation for all Inclusive SA and DAIP actions in future iterations.

Priority Groups

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability have a right to respect and acknowledgment as the first peoples of Australia and for their unique history, culture and kinship relationships and connection to their traditional land and waters. Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability face multiple disadvantages.

People from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds

Cultural, language, and other differences create barriers to providing supports and services to people with disability from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Women

Many women with disability face multiple disadvantages and on average, experience higher rates of abuse and exploitation than women without disability.

Children

Children with disability have the right to a full life in conditions that ensure the child’s dignity, promote self-reliance, and facilitate the child’s active and full participation in family, cultural, and social life.

Children with disability are more vulnerable to risk of abuse or exploitation.

The developmental needs of children with disability must be taken into account, with particular focus on critical periods in their childhood and adolescence.

Building on our vision through community collaboration

Building on our vision through community collaboration

Over the last 12 months DHS has listened to the experiences of people living with disability in the priority groups to better understand their needs.

The outcomes of this consultation will support State authorities to create better access and inclusion for all people living with disability. DHS is grateful to the people who participated in the consultation. Through the life of Inclusive SA, DHS will continue to consult with people living with disability.

What we heard from people living with disability

It’s only done white fella way, you need to fill in forms, they don’t understand, I want someone to talk to me.
Some men may be suspicious or fear programs that may undermine their status, men may wonder, what are you teaching our women? Are you teaching them to stand up against men?
I asked an Aboriginal person who had a significant physical disability if they needed support and they said no because they had learnt to get around and rely on family.
A mentoring system for young people with disability starting their first job would be helpful. Young people said, don’t set us up for failure.
Some people from CALD backgrounds are reluctant or nervous to engage, where I come from, governments are corrupt. They issue large punishments for small offences.
We don’t want to be babied more than other young people, we’re ordinary people who just go about things differently.
People want to point to the customer as the problem rather than the system, the system can lock people out.
People forget that we exist. This has a domino effect on planning. We feel like we’re not part of the community.

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State Government agencies and local council’s priority group activity

The Electoral Commission of South Australia has employed an Aboriginal Engagement Officer who is undertaking an outreach program, including working with Aboriginal people living with disability and service providers.

SA Police (SAPOL) Community Engagement Section has developed a Multicultural Action Plan for people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living with disability.

The City of West Torrens delivers school holiday and summer activities for children living with disabilities (for example, sensory tent, big games).

The Yorke Peninsula Council supports leisure, living skills, and social activity programs for people living with disability. This includes school holiday programs.

The City of Victor Harbor supports young people living with a disability including by providing low sensory sessions and adaptive resources for children in the library.

The development and implementation of the SA Water DAIP involved people from CALD backgrounds and was co-led by a young person living with disability.

Wellbeing SA has projects to improve the health and wellbeing of women living with disability. The Secondary Prevention Branch has planned work in co-designing solutions with people with intellectual disability to increase cancer screening participation.

The Botanic Gardens’ Little Sprouts Kitchen Garden Learning Program will continue to support the inclusion of children with disability.

The Guardian for Children and Young People, Commissioner for Children and Young People and the Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People regularly consult during the development of initiatives and reform of legislation to ensure issues affecting young people with a disability inform decision making.

The Department for Child Protection has an Aboriginal Procurement Policy and ensures service requirements reflect the needs of Aboriginal children and young people with disability. An NDIS tool has been developed to assist with case management to support access to culturally responsive disability supports for Aboriginal children and young people in care with an NDIS plan.

The City of Murray Bridge supports Tinyeri Children’s Centre’s Wild Child – Wild Play program creating inclusive projects for community with a large focus on Aboriginal and multicultural families living with disability.

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Progress of Inclusive SA actions 2020–2021

Progress of Inclusive SA actions 2020–2021

Inclusive SA

  • Total actions: 39
  • Completed actions, or have commenced and are ongoing for the life of the plan: 12
  • Actions in progress: 27

Progress reports - state authorities have completed

  • Local councils: 58
  • State Government agencies: 29
  • Authorities still to report: 12

Inclusive SA action 22 - state government websites

State government agencies will improve online accessibility of state government websites.

  • Complete: 7
  • In progress: 21
  • To start: 1

Inclusive SA action 19 - local council car parks

Local council access and inclusion planning to consider Universal Design principles and review of accessible car parks.

  • Still to report: 4
  • Complete: 9
  • In progress: 44
  • To start: 1

All State authorities

Inclusive SA Action 9 - ensuring induction of new employees is inclusive of information about working with people with disability: 86 per cent.

Inclusive SA Action 11 - supporting young people with disability to actively participate in decision-making: 74 per cent.

Inclusive SA Action 26 - progressing upgrades to signage and/or installation of multimedia devices to improve accessibility: 72 per cent.

Inclusive SA Action 36 - facilitating meaningful volunteer opportunities for people with disability: 70 per cent.

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Inclusive SA themes

Inclusive communities for all

  • In progress: 50 per cent
  • To start: 12 per cent
  • Complete/ongoing: 38 per cent

Leadership and collaboration

  • In progress: 59 per cent
  • To start: 26 per cent
  • Complete/ongoing: 15 per cent

Accessible communities

  • In progress: 67 per cent
  • To start: 16 per cent
  • Complete/ongoing: 17 per cent

Learning and employment

  • In progress: 56 per cent
  • To start: 26 per cent
  • Complete/ongoing: 18 per cent

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Inclusive SA priority group

Authorities that have actions targeted to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with disability: 62

Authorities that have actions targeted to people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds living with disability: 60

Authorities that have actions targeted to women living with disability: 64

Authorities that have specific actions targeted to children and young people living
with disability: 58

Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) actions

2,804 DAIP actions have been created by 87 authorities.

All authorities

  • Not started: 873
  • In progress: 1,224
  • Complete or ongoing: 707

State government agency

  • Not started: 136
  • In progress: 401
  • Complete or ongoing: 302

Local council

  • Not started: 737
  • In progress: 823
  • Complete or ongoing: 405

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Theme One: Inclusive communities for all

Theme One: Inclusive communities for all

Social inclusion is a priority for people living with disability as it affects all aspects of their lives. It is our aim that the contributions and rights of people living with disability are valued and understood by all South Australians and that their rights are promoted, upheld and protected.

We also want to ensure that people living with disability are supported to advocate for their own rights.

Priority 1: Involvement in the community

Action 1

Develop an event toolkit to promote accessible and inclusive practices for State authorities in community events.

Status: Complete

Estimated timeframe: 2020–21

Notes: DHS co-designed the Accessible and Inclusive Community Events Toolkit, published on the Inclusive SA website.

Action 2

Explore the redesign or creation of an app (or other medium) that displays existing and future services and facilities (such as toilets, eateries, sports and recreation facilities, parks and trails, arts organisations and cultural institutions, transport services, beaches that are wheelchair and disability-access friendly).

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2022–23

Notes: The feasibility process has been completed and the supplier has now commenced the design and development of the Inclusive SA app, in conjunction with people with lived experience who have informed the accessibility requirements and the scope of data/information to be included. DHS continues to liaise with the supplier to ensure on-track delivery of the project by early 2022.

Action 3

Develop and promote inclusive play guidelines to guide local councils and other community groups in the development of accessible and inclusive playgrounds and play spaces.

Status: Complete

Estimated timeframe: 2019–20

Notes: Completed in 2019–2020 Annual Report.

Action 4

Collaborate with relevant organisations to run disability access and inclusion awareness training for arts organisations, cultural institutions, sporting organisations and clubs.

Status: Ongoing

Estimated timeframe: 2022–23

Notes: The Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing hosted a Game On network session in July 2021 with a presentation from One Culture Support Services, a not-for-profit disability service that empowers people of all cultures and abilities.

The South Australian Metropolitan Fire Service Road Awareness Program (RAP) has been expanded to include workplaces, sporting clubs, correctional services facilities and community organisations. The RAP is a powerful, hard-hitting road safety presentation delivered by firefighters and crash survivors, many now living with a disability, who share their stories with both young and experienced drivers across South Australia and interstate to help them gain a better understanding of what it means to live with a disability.

Arts South Australia provided funding to Access2Arts to develop and trial an online module for disability awareness training. The sector advocates have developed an additional hybrid (in person/on-line) package of disability awareness training for larger organisations which was launched in March 2021.

Action 5

Explore opportunities to increase the involvement of children with disability in sports and cultural activities, for example:

  • expanding the Sports Voucher program for children living with disability
  • providing extra support for children living with disability to participate in VACSWIM
  • promoting the availability of arts programs for children living with disability.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing has initiated a study in partnership with the University of South Australia to understand and improve the reach of the program for disadvantaged communities, including for children living with disability. The aim is to ensure greater inclusion for children with a disability to participate in the VACSWIM Program.

The State Library of South Australia, South Australian Museum and Art Gallery of South Australia continue to provide accessible education programs for children, including sensory-friendly experiences for children with autism, Auslan interpreted tours and multi-sensory and audio described events and tours. Multi-media resources for children with visual or auditory needs are now available.

Arts South Australia continues to fund Restless Dance Theatre and Tutti Arts to run dance theatre workshops and out-of-school hours arts programs for children and young people living with disability.

The State Public Library Services developed sensory story time training videos, which include disability terms and concepts of inclusion, to be used by public libraries and their customers.

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Priority 2: Improving community understanding and awareness

Action 6

Work with relevant State authorities to improve community understanding and awareness that complements and leverages the national effort under the National Disability Strategy 2010–2020 and the emerging National Disability Strategy for beyond 2020.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2022–23

Notes: DHS has supported the national effort and implementation of Australia’s Disability Strategy 2021–2031 (ADS), launched on 3 December 2021, by facilitating discussions with State authorities to inform the development and agreement of South Australia’s Targeted Action Plans (TAP). TAPs identify activities to support community awareness of the ADS objectives and connections to Inclusive SA.

In addition, DHS launched the ‘Report it Right’ Guidelines for portraying people with disability in November 2021. The Guidelines support the media in shifting the narrative about what it truly means to live with disability and ensure articles on/about people with disability are written using standard human empathy and interest, without excessive emotional and/or stereotypical language.

Action 7

Work with the Commonwealth Government to develop data indicators that measure changes in community attitudes about the rights and needs of people living with disability.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2021–22

Notes: DHS continues to seek opportunities to work with the Commonwealth Government on initiatives that measure changes in community attitudes about the rights and needs of people living with disability, with consideration to Australia’s Disability Strategy 2021–2031.

In 2022, the State Government will roll out a community awareness campaign that aims to change community perceptions and understanding about disability, underpinned by significant consultation with the disability community to inform the media brief. At the conclusion of the campaign, DHS will undertake an evaluation to measure community impact which will inform next steps.

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Priority 3: Promoting the rights of people living with disability

Action 8

Review disability awareness training packages within State Government agencies, including public health settings, to establish best practice and implement for new and existing employees.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2021–22

Notes: In 2021, the Office of the Commissioner of Public Sector Employment (OCPSE) surveyed public sector agencies’ uptake on disability awareness and inclusion training and coordinated Disability Inclusion training for over 50 public sector employees. In addition, the OCPSE has engaged with:

  • the Disability Advocacy and Complaints Service of South Australia to identify issues for people living with disability when creating inclusive workplaces and inform best practice
  • the Australian Migrant Resource Centre on how to address the barriers faced by culturally and linguistically diverse community members with disability
  • SA Health to develop disability awareness training for health settings.

The Office of the Commissioner of Public Sector Employment is developing a report that identifies contemporary best practice principles with recommendations on how agencies can improve disability inclusion and awareness training.

Action 9

Ensure induction of new State authority employees includes information about working with people living with disability.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: 86 per cent of all State authorities are in the process of ensuring that induction of new employees is inclusive of information about working with people with disability. Further information can be found in State authorities’ DAIPs. All DAIPs can be accessed on the Inclusive SA website.

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Theme Two: Leadership and collaboration

Theme Two: Leadership and collaboration

People living with disability want to have a greater role in leading and contributing to government and community decision-making. It is our aim that the perspectives of people living with disability are actively sought and that they are supported to participate meaningfully in government and community consultation and engagement activities.

Priority 4: Participation in decision-making

Action 10

Share the learnings of the improved Supported Decision-Making approach for people living in State Government accommodation services with State authorities.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2022–23

Notes: The Office of the Public Advocate (OPA) commenced a supported decision-making project in October 2021, in partnership with the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, to document the choices of OPA clients who have impaired decision-making capacity.

To date, a project and governance framework has been established, with an internal working group, health interface group and reference group meeting to progress the work.

Action 11

State authorities to support young people living with disability to actively participate in decision-making.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2022–23

Notes: 74 per cent of all State authorities are supporting young people with disability to actively participate in decision-making. Further information can be found in State authorities’ DAIPs. All DAIPs can be accessed on the Inclusive SA website.

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Priority 5: Leadership and raising profile

Action 12

Develop a communications strategy to promote BoardingCall, the South Australian Government recruitment register for boards and committees, to ensure it is promoted to people living with disability.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2022–23

Notes: The Department of the Premier and Cabinet’s accessibility enhancement to BoardingCall is currently in progress and a communication strategy is expected to be completed by 30 June 2022.

Action 13

Ensure high quality and co-ordinated engagement with the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability, including providing consistent, accurate and relevant information, through a dedicated response unit led by the Attorney-General’s Department.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes:  The Disability Royal Commission Response Unit has:

  • monitored 16 public hearings and prepared hearing summaries
  • managed agency participation at two public hearings involving the State of South Australia
  • coordinated agency responses to 20 Summons to Produce statements and/or documents
  • assisted agencies to respond to three Royal Commission Issues Papers
  • distributed a regular newsletter to inform stakeholders of the activities of the Disability Royal Commission.

The Royal Commission will provide its final report to the State Government by 29 September 2023.

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Priority 6: Engagement and consultation

Action 14

Develop a toolkit that supports State authorities to consult and engage with people living with disability when developing policies and programs, which:

  • promotes and explains co-design principles
  • focuses on supports for consultation within regional South Australia.

Status: Complete

Estimated timeframe: 2020–21

Notes: DHS co-designed the Engagement and Consultation with People living with Disability toolkit, published on the Inclusive SA website and is available in an accessible format.

Action 15

Review the function of the Disability Engagement Group (DEG) to:

  • ensure membership is focused on people living with disability and carers
  • increase membership in rural and regional areas
  • increase the use of the DEG members in decision-making and policy initiatives
  • support members to develop advisory and leadership skills.

Status: Complete

Estimated timeframe: 2020–21

Notes: DHS has completed the review of the Disability Engagement Group and a new 12-member group of members with lived experience of disability from metropolitan and country areas will meet in February 2022.

DEG members will include:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
  • women
  • children.

The DEG members will provide vital advice on the future direction of Inclusive SA, contributing to improved access and inclusion for South Australians with disabilities.

We will continue to communicate with the current 400 members via Disability Talk.

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Theme Three: Accessible communities

Theme Three: Accessible communities

The accessibility of the built environment, quality services and information is key to ensuring people living with disability are included and have the opportunity to equally participate in all aspects of community life. It is our aim to increase accessibility to public and community infrastructure, transport, services, information, sport and recreation and the greater community.

Priority 7: Universal Design across South Australia

Actions 16

Elevate the design quality of South Australia’s built environment and public realms through promoting design quality policy and the principles of Universal Design.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The Art Gallery of South Australia ensured the principles for Universal Design were considered during the refurbishment of the front of the Gallery, including the portico area, and have installed new signage, incorporating braille and tactile maps to improve wayfinding for all visitors.

All stages of Lot Fourteen public realm design continue to be reviewed to ensure compliance with relevant codes. The refurbishment works for the Eleanor Harrald Building has involved review of the design and scope of works by a disability access consultant to ensure building access that is compliant with the Disability Discrimination Act 1992.

Action 17

Explore the feasibility of adopting Universal Design procedures across State Government (as currently used by the Department of the Premier and Cabinet) in the design, construction, maintenance and procurement of all workplace environments, customer environments, systems, intranets and websites, and programs and policies. This will include:

  • applying Universal Design principles to sport and recreation infrastructure projects to support family friendly and accessible facilities
  • considering Universal Design principles in infrastructure works and maintenance across the Department for Environment and Water managed land, infrastructure and parks
  • adopting Liveable Housing Australia design guidelines for all new build social housing stock
  • considering incorporating Universal Design principles in residential construction and maintenance specifications for SA Housing Authority houses
  • improving access for people living with disability in the redevelopment of the Sir Samuel Way and Supreme Court buildings.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing’s Recreation and Sport Facility Design Guide is being reviewed to incorporate new developments and Universal Design principles to inform the quality infrastructure assessment criteria for project grants of sport and recreation infrastructure.

In the last year, universal design principles were applied to the following projects, helping to make sport and recreation accessible to all South Australians:

  • Women’s Memorial Playing Fields redevelopment — new changerooms and clubroom (construction phase)
  • State Centre of Football (construction phase)
  • Basketball SA Stadium (design phase)
  • SA Athletics Stadium — new changeroom and refurbishment of existing changerooms (design phase)
  • New South Australian Sports Institute (design phase)
  • Netball SA Stadium (design phase).

The Department for Environment and Water’s latest initiative, Parks 2025, is a collection of investment initiatives designed to help build the capacity of parks across South Australia to conserve natural landscapes and wildlife, boost the state economy and strengthen local communities. All new infrastructure builds in this initiative consider Universal Design in the concept plans and design phase.

The Art Gallery of South Australia has installed disability access signage and Braille embossed wayfinding posts at the building entrance. Accessible audio guides have been implemented and security guards and gallery guides have been provided training to assist patrons with disability.

In addition, the Gallery launched the Access Guide on International Day of People with a Disability on 3 December 2021. The Access Guide has been designed to be as inclusive as possible, with the following tour options:

  • Self-guided audio.
  • Audio description (for people who are blind or vision impaired).
  • Auslan (for people who are deaf or hearing impaired).
  • Plain English (for people who have an intellectually disability, are neuro- diverse, or who speak English as a second language.)

The South Australian Museum’s new Strategic Plan 2021–25 includes a commitment to ensuring all publications, gallery refurbishments, and exhibitions over the next three years meet the Smithsonian Guidelines for Accessible Design standards for museums as a minimum and that Universal Design principles are embedded in all new capital and refurbishment projects across the museum.

The Adelaide Metro website has been upgraded and accredited by Vision Australia as meeting Level AA Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0, after the implementation of solutions including enhanced navigation, colour contrast, alternate text and use of simple language.

SA Housing Authority has commenced consultations with the community housing sector to review internal design guidelines to promote alignment with the Liveable Housing Design Guidelines.

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Action 18

Contribute to the national conversation on the possibility of introducing Silver or Gold level Liveable Housing standards for all new housing to be applied through the National Construction Code from 2022.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The draft National Construction Code 2022 now includes accessibility provisions that ensure dwellings meet the needs of the community, including older Australians and people with mobility limitations. These provisions were adapted from the Silver level requirements of the Liveable Housing Design Guidelines, first published by Liveable Housing Australia, with significant public consultation in 2021.

Action 19

Local council access and inclusion planning to consider consultation outcomes including:

  • incorporating Universal Design principles in criteria for all new building and public projects and planning for programs, services and events
  • developing Universal Design training plans for staff and contractors
  • review of availability of accessible car parks.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: 91 per cent of all local councils are including access and inclusion within their consultation and planning, incorporating Universal Design principles and training and review of accessible car parks. Further information can be found in State authorities’ DAIPs. All DAIPs can be accessed on the Inclusive SA website.

The Adelaide Hills Council was one of six participating councils that trained their staff in Universal Design principles as part of the Regional Champions for Accessible Destinations project. The council has incorporated Universal Design principles in the design of projects such as the FABRIK Arts and Heritage Hub in Lobethal. The council has also commenced a project to improve car parking accessibility within the council area, making it easier for people living with a disability to participate in their local community.

The City of Playford’s Fremont Park All-Abilities Play Space opened in late 2020 and features:

  • The City of Playford’s first Changing Places facility
  • an all-abilities flying fox seat
  • a Liberty Swing
  • sensory, music and nature play
  • a Playground Chat Communication Board
  • and many other inclusive design features.

The City of Playford received many enquiries from other councils, schools and early childhood learning centres about the initiative and as a result, a number of other Communication Boards have been installed in the community.

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Priority 8: Accessible and available information

Action 20

Create the Inclusive SA website (and consider other communication media) to provide key resources for people living with disability and the community to raise awareness about disability.

Status: Complete

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: DHS continues to enhance the Inclusive SA website and content to provide key resources and support for the community.

Action 21

Develop a toolkit to support State authorities to ensure communication about their services is available in a range of accessible formats. These may include easy read, Auslan, pictorial forms, large font, audible options, Braille, closed captions and VoiceOver.

Status: Complete

Estimated timeframe: 2020–21

Notes: DHS co-designed the accessible communication toolkit, published on the Inclusive SA website and available in an accessible format.

Action 22

Improve online accessibility of State Government websites, including through implementation of the Online Accessibility Policy and related guidelines.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: 97 per cent of all State Government agencies have improved online accessibility of State Government websites. Further information can be found in State Government agencies’ and local councils’ DAIPs. All DAIPs can be accessed on the Inclusive SA website.

The Online Accessibility Toolkit, developed by the Department of the Premier and Cabinet, is recognised as a world-leading and multiple award-winning accessibility resource. In June 2021, for the third year running, the SAGOV Online Accessibility Toolkit achieved the Plain English Campaign’s Internet Crystal Mark.

Complementing this, the Department of the Premier and Cabinet continues to provide across-agency leadership to support agencies to meet their online accessibility obligations and represents South Australia at the national level on the Digital Access and Inclusion Working Group represented by all jurisdictions in Australia.

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Priority 9: Access to services

Action 23

Continue to work collaboratively with the Commonwealth Government and the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) to develop strategies to support a diverse disability workforce, including within regional South Australia.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: In October 2021, DHS noted the progress on the implementation of the NDIS National Workforce Plan. South Australia is committed to working with the Commonwealth to grow the disability workforce through supporting new NDIS market entrants and working with the Department of Innovation and Skills, universities and providers to build and enhance the pathways into the disability workforce.

Action 24

Further develop Auslan interpreter capacity (by drawing on people with lived experience).

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The Department for Innovation and Skills funds Deaf:Can Do to provide introductory Auslan training for speech pathologists and occupational therapists who work with children and adults. DIS continues to subsidise Auslan training to upskill workforces and occupations working with Deaf and hearing-impaired people.

Action 25

Develop and promote a toolkit for signage, wayfinding and multimedia devices for State authorities to support deaf, hard of hearing, blind, vision or hearing-impaired persons.

Status: Complete

Estimated timeframe: 2020–21

Notes: DHS co-designed accessible wayfinding and signage toolkit has been published on the Inclusive SA website and is available in an accessible format.

Action 26

State authorities to consider including in their infrastructure maintenance and upgrade schedules the installation of signs on the front of public buildings indicating disability access (where this has been assessed by an accredited access consultant) and installation of multimedia devices in queues at service outlets to include people who are deaf, hard of hearing, vision-impaired or blind.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: 72 per cent of all State authorities are progressing upgrades to signage and/or installation of multimedia devices in their infrastructure maintenance and upgrade schedules. Further information can be found in State authorities’ DAIPs. To access the DAIPs, visit the Inclusive SA website.

The Barossa Council has undertaken a dementia-friendly audit of their library and foyer and consulted with their Disability Access and Inclusion Advisory Group to assess the recommendations.

The District Council of Ceduna has scheduled 90 per cent of their public toilets for replacement to ensure they are accessible for people living with disability.

The City of Mount Gambier has incorporated accessible multimedia in the design of new Wulanda Recreation and Convention Centre.

Whyalla City Council’s Changing Places toilet facilities on the foreshore have made a big difference to people living with disability, who are now able to visit the beach and surrounding area without having to cut their outing short.

The Copper Coast Council has positioned accessible signage throughout the region, including finger signage on roads to indicate public spaces that have accessible facilities. Signage and braille have been added to all public toilets and multimedia has been trialled in libraries.

The Rural City of Murray Bridge established City Wide Signage Design Guidelines in 2019 and the design standards and wayfinding principles are now applied consistently and include access icons. The council has since installed and upgraded disability signage in public toilets and installed a hearing loop in meeting rooms and the reception area.

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Action 27

Implement the Canine Court Companion pilot project to provide increased practical support and assistance to vulnerable victims and prosecution witnesses involved with the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2022–23

Notes: Legislation was passed in 2021 to allow canine companions to accompany vulnerable witnesses while they are giving evidence in South Australia’s courts. The Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions has committed to the Canine Court Companion program with Guide Dogs SA/NT until February 2024. Thirty-eight appointments with vulnerable witnesses were attended by the canine companion between April 2020 and February 2021.

Action 28

Continue to work with the Commonwealth Government to reform the Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002.

Status: Ongoing

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The Department for Infrastructure and Transport (DIT) contributes to the National Accessible Transport Taskforce Working Groups and Steering Committee and provides the South Australian contribution to progress legislative reform to modernise the Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002.

Action 29

Ensure the state-owned bus fleet is accessible, including disability awareness training for frontline public transport staff and the consideration of voice systems in buses that notify people of the next stop.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: DIT continues to provide disability awareness training to their frontline staff and provide resources for employees. Additional and more targeted training, including presentations by peak disability organisations, is provided to frontline staff. Customer Care Services incorporate Sighted Guide Training which is facilitated by the Royal Society for the Blind South Australia. A train the trainer program has also been added to the customer service module for the Passenger Service Assistants.

All new buses are fitted with the next stop information system supporting customers with vision impairment to gain greater independence and assurance that they are alighting at the appropriate journey travel points.

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Action 30

Promote liaison and communication links between health services and disability support services, and improve the continuity of supports, including psychosocial supports, during hospitalisation.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The Department for Health and Wellbeing continues to promote the liaison and communication links between systems to ensure South Australians living with disability are supported.

Action 31

Consider establishing minimum standards for priority parks and reserves (including coasts, heritage places and Crown land) that improve access and inclusion for people living with disability and implement a program of priority actions, including exemplar visitor experiences.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2021–22

Notes: The Department for Environment and Water has developed an action plan to ensure the continual improvement of accessibility to parks and an Accessibility Guideline is being developed to ensure that all future projects consider access and inclusion.

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Theme Four: Learning and employment

Theme Four: Learning and employment

Workforce participation is fundamental to social inclusion.

It provides economic independence and choice, social connections and friendships, value, identity and belonging. It is our aim that people living with disability have access to inclusive places of study and that education and training provides pathways to meaningful and inclusive employment and volunteering opportunities.

Priority 10: Better supports within educational and training settings

Action 32

State education and training sectors to support inclusive education culture and practices.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: In 2021, the Department for Education introduced the Inclusive Teacher of the Year (Disability) Award as a category in the Public Education Awards. This category acknowledges teachers who exemplify inclusive education and demonstrate outstanding practice to improve outcomes for learners with disability. Additionally, the My Wellbeing Survey will be rolled out across the department and will measure staff experience of inclusivity.

Action 33

State education authorities to work in partnership with children, students, parents or carers, industries and the community to provide curriculum and learning opportunities that are personalised and tailored to the individual, and prepare for life beyond school.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The Department for Education is implementing a 'One in Four' reform program to establish a model of support that leads to improved learning and development outcomes for children and students with functional needs in Government of South Australia schools and preschools.

Action 34

Determine data required to measure and track the percentage of people living with disability participating and achieving in education and training.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: DHS has completed the National Disability Data Asset South Australian pilot test case: Education to Employment, capturing and analysing data related to the pathways from education to employment for people with disability. The test case report will be shared with stakeholders in 2022.

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Priority 11: Skill development through volunteering and support in navigating the pathway between learning and earning

Action 35

Explore how pathways can be improved from education and training settings to post-learning.

Status: Ongoing

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The Department for Education Disability Transition Program supported 75 students in 2021, with all year 12 students completing their SACE with a clear transition pathway. Consultation has commenced with disability employment service providers to better understand the issues that impact students with disability during the post-school transition process to guide the program beyond 2022. Initial consultation identified key themes surrounding the complexities and barriers faced by students with disability and these issues will be addressed as part of a broader pathways strategy, currently under development.

The Department for Innovation and Skills has updated the Foundation Skills Guidelines to promote inclusion of people with disability, improve educator capacity and support smooth transition to further training, Vocational Education and Training, traineeships, apprenticeships and employment. All students facing significant barriers to completing their training can access Learning Support Services fee-free, individualised case management to address barriers that may be impacting on their ability to retain or complete their training.

In 2020 the National Centre for Vocational Education Research reported the following student outcomes for South Australians who participated in Vocational Education and Training and reported as having disability:

  • 54.1 per cent employed after training (up more than 5 percentage points on 2019)
  • 22.2 per cent enrolled in further study after training (slightly down on 2019)
  • 66 per cent employed after training or in further study (up more than 5 percentage points on 2019).

Action 36

State authorities to facilitate meaningful volunteering opportunities for people living with disability.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2022–23

Notes: 70 per cent of all State authorities are facilitating meaningful volunteer opportunities for people with disability.  Further information can be found in State authorities’ DAIPs. All DAIPs can be accessed on the Inclusive SA website.

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Priority 12: Improved access to employment opportunities and better support within workplaces

Action 37

Support and promote the implementation of the Office of the Commissioner for Public Sector Employment’s Public Sector Employment Strategy across the public sector.

Status: Ongoing

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The Office of the Commissioner for Public Sector supports and promotes the implementation of the South Australian Public Sector Disability Employment Strategy across the public sector through the provision of tools and resources, information sharing, and supporting engagement with public sector agencies. The Office of the Commissioner for Public Sector has established working groups to promote and implement the strategy. Specific initiatives undertaken include:

  • identifying and addressing barriers to sharing disability status and investigation of alternate methods for disclosure
  • promoting employment outcomes and career development opportunities for employees living with disability
  • identifying champions of disability employment within the sector to raise awareness of disability employment
  • promoting and encouraging participation in significant events, for example, International Day of People with Disability.

Action 38

Increase employment opportunities across all levels in the South Australian public sector through the targeting of job opportunities for people living with disability under section 65 of the Public Sector Act 2009 (SA) which provides for employment opportunity programs.

Status: Ongoing

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The Office of the Commissioner for Public Sector Employment has included this action in the South Australian Public Sector Disability Employment Plan. Provisions exist under the Public Sector Act 2009 (SA) for candidates registered with a Disability Employment Service provider to apply for internal public sector vacancies. The Office of the Commissioner for Public Sector Employment has developed resources for public sector agencies and disability employment service providers to promote this employment opportunity program and provide advice on how to distribute information on vacancies. These resources are available on the Office of the Commissioner for Public Sector Employment website.

Action 39

Develop data measures to track the percentage of people living with disability employed and retained in State authorities.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: DHS has completed its work on the National Disability Data Asset South Australian pilot test case: Education to Employment that looked specifically at education to employment pathways for people living with disability. The test case explored the barriers to employment. The test case report will be shared with stakeholders in 2022.

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Launching in 2022

Launching in 2022

Smartphone app

The Department of Human Services, in collaboration with the Department for Innovation and Skills and South Australian start-up The Moonshine Lab, is proud to launch a uniquely South Australian smartphone app in 2022.

An iOS and Android compatible smartphone app is being developed to provide accessibility and general information on South Australian venues, facilities, parklands and play spaces, recreation and entertainment centres and cultural institutions to drive inclusion, independence, and empowerment for people living with disability and the wider community.

People with disability and those with lived experience, along with the general public, played a central role in shaping the functionality of the app and optimising its usability and accessibility – whilst also playing an ongoing role in providing ‘crowdsourced’ ratings and feedback to bolster location data within the app. Once launched, users can search for locations and rate their experience as it relates to accessibility.

There is clear evidence of broad and sweeping appreciation for the role that technology can play in improving the independence and experience of people living with disability in public spaces. The app will be a one-stop-shop for a more accessible South Australia.

See Me For Me

The See Me For Me community awareness campaign to improve community perceptions and understanding of what it means to live with a disability is South Australia’s first disability awareness campaign and will be launched by June 2022.

During 2020–21, the Department for Human Services undertook extensive consultation with JFA Purple Orange to ensure people living with disability were represented and participated in the creative concept process, including the use of language. During the consultation it was agreed not to present people living with disability as heroes. Rather, those living with disability want to be seen in the same way as those living without a disability, as having everyday interests and likes. This communication campaign is to reinforce disability as another form of diversity within society.

A See Me For Me webpage will be added to the Inclusive SA website and will provide information on using correct terms when talking about disability, as well as posters and social media resources for organisations to use.

Next steps

Next steps

Driving Inclusive SA

The Government of South Australia is taking a lead on promoting access and inclusion of people living with disability. Inclusive SA is the State’s commitment to achieving our goals and to guide our work in challenging the barriers and exclusion that people living with disability experience daily.

Throughout the life of Inclusive SA, we will look to develop new opportunities and identify new ways for people living with disability to participate fully in their communities.

Our aim is to see all State authorities work towards common goals and shared directions for 2021–22 and beyond.

Australia’s Disability Strategy

Another way we are accountable for our progress with Inclusive SA is through our implementation of Australia’s Disability Strategy 2021–2031 (ADS). The ADS complements the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, ensuring people with disability can participate in all areas of Australian life and fulfil their potential as equal citizens. The ADS is a shared commitment by all Australian Governments to work together to improve the lives of Australians living with disability, their families and their carers.

Australia’s Disability Strategy was released on the International Day of People with Disability, 3 December 2021.

A key part of the ADS are Targeted Action Plans (TAPs) which help apply an intensive focus to achieve specific deliverables for people with disability. The five initial TAPs focus on employment, community attitudes, early childhood, safety and emergency management.

South Australia’s Targeted Action Plan actions highlight the work already underway and align to Inclusive SA. As part of the TAPs, South Australia has committed to undertaking a review of Inclusive SA and the Disability Inclusion Act 2018 (SA) to ensure alignment with Australia’s Disability Strategy.

The Department of Human Services will ensure that planning and engagement undertaken by the Australian Government is shared with State authorities to promote targeted, localised communication in driving the aims of the ADS.

Review of Inclusive SA

The Disability Inclusion Act 2018 (SA) requires the Minister for Human Services to review Inclusive SA once in each four-year period to ensure that the actions and measures State authorities are undertaking continue to evolve and meet the shifting priorities of people living with disability in South Australia.

With the launch of Australia’s Disability Strategy, the Department of Human Services has commenced an interim review. The second edition of Inclusive SA will guide the State authorities in the delivery of the Targeted Action Plans.

Priority Groups

The Department of Human Services will focus on implementing the guiding principles that have been developed to improve access and inclusion for priority groups under the Act:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
  • women
  • children.

These principles will support State authorities to create better access and inclusion for all people living with disability.

Glossary

Glossary

Australia Disability Strategy (ADS)

The ADS is a national plan that aims to improve the life experiences of Australians living with disability, their families and carers.

Best practice

A method or technique that has been generally accepted as superior to any alternatives because it produces results that are better to those achieved by other means or because it has become a standard way of doing things.

Built environments

Artificial structures, features and facilities viewed collectively as an environment in which people live and work.

Changing Places

Changing Places provide suitable facilities for people who cannot used standard accessible toilets.

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Commonwealth

The government of the Commonwealth of Australia – commonly referred to as the Australian Government or the Federal Government.

Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP)

Disability Access and Inclusion Plan prepared by State authorities for their own agency, department or council area.

Disability Engagement Group (DEG)

The DEG is a 12-member disability engagement group whose members have lived experience of disability and represent diverse cultural backgrounds, gender identities and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. They also represent the interests of people living in metropolitan and regional locations. The DEG provides advice on future directions of the State Disability Inclusion Plan, Inclusive SA contribute to improving access and inclusion for people with disability.

Government agencies

A government agency is responsible for the oversight and administration of specific functions across the state and is established by legislation.

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Local councils

A system of government in South Australia under which elected local government bodies (councils) are constituted under the Local Government Act 1999 (SA).

Mainstream

Products and services that are readily available to the public, as opposed to being applicable only to a very specific subset of the general population.

National Disability Strategy (NDS)

National Disability Strategy 2010–2020 — a shared commitment by all governments to work together to improve the lives of Australians with disability by guiding governments and other organisations to build the wellbeing of people living with disability and their carers.

State authority

As defined in the Disability Inclusion Act 2018: an administrative unit (within the meaning of the Public Sector Act 2009 (SA), or a local council established under the Local Government Act 1999 (SA).

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Targeted Action Plans (TAPs)

TAPs are a key part of the Australia Disability Strategy and help apply an intensive focus to achieve specific deliverables for people living with disability. There are 5 TAPS.

Toolkit

A suite of information documents that may include guidelines, templates and procedures to assist in the completion of a task.

Universal Design

Universal Design involves creating facilities, built environs, products and services that can be used by people of all abilities to the greatest extent possible without adaptations.

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Inclusive SA Annual Report 2020–2021 (DOCX 99.8 KB)

Inclusive SA Annual Report 2020–2021 - Easy Read (PDF 9.1 MB)

Inclusive SA Annual Report 2020–2021 (PDF 4.6 MB)

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This site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Licence. © Copyright 2021 DHS .

Provided by:
Department of Human Services
URL:
https://inclusive.sa.gov.au/resources/inclusive-sa-annual-report
Last Updated:
12 Aug 2020
Printed on:
04 Jul 2022
The Inclusive SA website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia Licence. © Copyright 2016