Inclusive SA

Theme Three: Accessible communities

The accessibility of the built environment, quality services and information is key to ensuring people living with disability are included and have the opportunity to equally participate in all aspects of community life. It is our aim to increase accessibility to public and community infrastructure, transport, services, information, sport and recreation and the greater community.

Priority 7: Universal Design across South Australia

Actions 16

Elevate the design quality of South Australia’s built environment and public realms through promoting design quality policy and the principles of Universal Design.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The Art Gallery of South Australia ensured the principles for Universal Design were considered during the refurbishment of the front of the Gallery, including the portico area, and have installed new signage, incorporating braille and tactile maps to improve wayfinding for all visitors.

All stages of Lot Fourteen public realm design continue to be reviewed to ensure compliance with relevant codes. The refurbishment works for the Eleanor Harrald Building has involved review of the design and scope of works by a disability access consultant to ensure building access that is compliant with the Disability Discrimination Act 1992.

Action 17

Explore the feasibility of adopting Universal Design procedures across State Government (as currently used by the Department of the Premier and Cabinet) in the design, construction, maintenance and procurement of all workplace environments, customer environments, systems, intranets and websites, and programs and policies. This will include:

  • applying Universal Design principles to sport and recreation infrastructure projects to support family friendly and accessible facilities
  • considering Universal Design principles in infrastructure works and maintenance across the Department for Environment and Water managed land, infrastructure and parks
  • adopting Liveable Housing Australia design guidelines for all new build social housing stock
  • considering incorporating Universal Design principles in residential construction and maintenance specifications for SA Housing Authority houses
  • improving access for people living with disability in the redevelopment of the Sir Samuel Way and Supreme Court buildings.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The Office for Recreation, Sport and Racing’s Recreation and Sport Facility Design Guide is being reviewed to incorporate new developments and Universal Design principles to inform the quality infrastructure assessment criteria for project grants of sport and recreation infrastructure.

In the last year, universal design principles were applied to the following projects, helping to make sport and recreation accessible to all South Australians:

  • Women’s Memorial Playing Fields redevelopment — new changerooms and clubroom (construction phase)
  • State Centre of Football (construction phase)
  • Basketball SA Stadium (design phase)
  • SA Athletics Stadium — new changeroom and refurbishment of existing changerooms (design phase)
  • New South Australian Sports Institute (design phase)
  • Netball SA Stadium (design phase).

The Department for Environment and Water’s latest initiative, Parks 2025, is a collection of investment initiatives designed to help build the capacity of parks across South Australia to conserve natural landscapes and wildlife, boost the state economy and strengthen local communities. All new infrastructure builds in this initiative consider Universal Design in the concept plans and design phase.

The Art Gallery of South Australia has installed disability access signage and Braille embossed wayfinding posts at the building entrance. Accessible audio guides have been implemented and security guards and gallery guides have been provided training to assist patrons with disability.

In addition, the Gallery launched the Access Guide on International Day of People with a Disability on 3 December 2021. The Access Guide has been designed to be as inclusive as possible, with the following tour options:

  • Self-guided audio.
  • Audio description (for people who are blind or vision impaired).
  • Auslan (for people who are deaf or hearing impaired).
  • Plain English (for people who have an intellectually disability, are neuro- diverse, or who speak English as a second language.)

The South Australian Museum’s new Strategic Plan 2021–25 includes a commitment to ensuring all publications, gallery refurbishments, and exhibitions over the next three years meet the Smithsonian Guidelines for Accessible Design standards for museums as a minimum and that Universal Design principles are embedded in all new capital and refurbishment projects across the museum.

The Adelaide Metro website has been upgraded and accredited by Vision Australia as meeting Level AA Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0, after the implementation of solutions including enhanced navigation, colour contrast, alternate text and use of simple language.

SA Housing Authority has commenced consultations with the community housing sector to review internal design guidelines to promote alignment with the Liveable Housing Design Guidelines.

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Action 18

Contribute to the national conversation on the possibility of introducing Silver or Gold level Liveable Housing standards for all new housing to be applied through the National Construction Code from 2022.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The draft National Construction Code 2022 now includes accessibility provisions that ensure dwellings meet the needs of the community, including older Australians and people with mobility limitations. These provisions were adapted from the Silver level requirements of the Liveable Housing Design Guidelines, first published by Liveable Housing Australia, with significant public consultation in 2021.

Action 19

Local council access and inclusion planning to consider consultation outcomes including:

  • incorporating Universal Design principles in criteria for all new building and public projects and planning for programs, services and events
  • developing Universal Design training plans for staff and contractors
  • review of availability of accessible car parks.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: 91 per cent of all local councils are including access and inclusion within their consultation and planning, incorporating Universal Design principles and training and review of accessible car parks. Further information can be found in State authorities’ DAIPs. All DAIPs can be accessed on the Inclusive SA website.

The Adelaide Hills Council was one of six participating councils that trained their staff in Universal Design principles as part of the Regional Champions for Accessible Destinations project. The council has incorporated Universal Design principles in the design of projects such as the FABRIK Arts and Heritage Hub in Lobethal. The council has also commenced a project to improve car parking accessibility within the council area, making it easier for people living with a disability to participate in their local community.

The City of Playford’s Fremont Park All-Abilities Play Space opened in late 2020 and features:

  • The City of Playford’s first Changing Places facility
  • an all-abilities flying fox seat
  • a Liberty Swing
  • sensory, music and nature play
  • a Playground Chat Communication Board
  • and many other inclusive design features.

The City of Playford received many enquiries from other councils, schools and early childhood learning centres about the initiative and as a result, a number of other Communication Boards have been installed in the community.

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Priority 8: Accessible and available information

Action 20

Create the Inclusive SA website (and consider other communication media) to provide key resources for people living with disability and the community to raise awareness about disability.

Status: Complete

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: DHS continues to enhance the Inclusive SA website and content to provide key resources and support for the community.

Action 21

Develop a toolkit to support State authorities to ensure communication about their services is available in a range of accessible formats. These may include easy read, Auslan, pictorial forms, large font, audible options, Braille, closed captions and VoiceOver.

Status: Complete

Estimated timeframe: 2020–21

Notes: DHS co-designed the accessible communication toolkit, published on the Inclusive SA website and available in an accessible format.

Action 22

Improve online accessibility of State Government websites, including through implementation of the Online Accessibility Policy and related guidelines.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: 97 per cent of all State Government agencies have improved online accessibility of State Government websites. Further information can be found in State Government agencies’ and local councils’ DAIPs. All DAIPs can be accessed on the Inclusive SA website.

The Online Accessibility Toolkit, developed by the Department of the Premier and Cabinet, is recognised as a world-leading and multiple award-winning accessibility resource. In June 2021, for the third year running, the SAGOV Online Accessibility Toolkit achieved the Plain English Campaign’s Internet Crystal Mark.

Complementing this, the Department of the Premier and Cabinet continues to provide across-agency leadership to support agencies to meet their online accessibility obligations and represents South Australia at the national level on the Digital Access and Inclusion Working Group represented by all jurisdictions in Australia.

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Priority 9: Access to services

Action 23

Continue to work collaboratively with the Commonwealth Government and the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) to develop strategies to support a diverse disability workforce, including within regional South Australia.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: In October 2021, DHS noted the progress on the implementation of the NDIS National Workforce Plan. South Australia is committed to working with the Commonwealth to grow the disability workforce through supporting new NDIS market entrants and working with the Department of Innovation and Skills, universities and providers to build and enhance the pathways into the disability workforce.

Action 24

Further develop Auslan interpreter capacity (by drawing on people with lived experience).

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The Department for Innovation and Skills funds Deaf:Can Do to provide introductory Auslan training for speech pathologists and occupational therapists who work with children and adults. DIS continues to subsidise Auslan training to upskill workforces and occupations working with Deaf and hearing-impaired people.

Action 25

Develop and promote a toolkit for signage, wayfinding and multimedia devices for State authorities to support deaf, hard of hearing, blind, vision or hearing-impaired persons.

Status: Complete

Estimated timeframe: 2020–21

Notes: DHS co-designed accessible wayfinding and signage toolkit has been published on the Inclusive SA website and is available in an accessible format.

Action 26

State authorities to consider including in their infrastructure maintenance and upgrade schedules the installation of signs on the front of public buildings indicating disability access (where this has been assessed by an accredited access consultant) and installation of multimedia devices in queues at service outlets to include people who are deaf, hard of hearing, vision-impaired or blind.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: 72 per cent of all State authorities are progressing upgrades to signage and/or installation of multimedia devices in their infrastructure maintenance and upgrade schedules. Further information can be found in State authorities’ DAIPs. To access the DAIPs, visit the Inclusive SA website.

The Barossa Council has undertaken a dementia-friendly audit of their library and foyer and consulted with their Disability Access and Inclusion Advisory Group to assess the recommendations.

The District Council of Ceduna has scheduled 90 per cent of their public toilets for replacement to ensure they are accessible for people living with disability.

The City of Mount Gambier has incorporated accessible multimedia in the design of new Wulanda Recreation and Convention Centre.

Whyalla City Council’s Changing Places toilet facilities on the foreshore have made a big difference to people living with disability, who are now able to visit the beach and surrounding area without having to cut their outing short.

The Copper Coast Council has positioned accessible signage throughout the region, including finger signage on roads to indicate public spaces that have accessible facilities. Signage and braille have been added to all public toilets and multimedia has been trialled in libraries.

The Rural City of Murray Bridge established City Wide Signage Design Guidelines in 2019 and the design standards and wayfinding principles are now applied consistently and include access icons. The council has since installed and upgraded disability signage in public toilets and installed a hearing loop in meeting rooms and the reception area.

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Action 27

Implement the Canine Court Companion pilot project to provide increased practical support and assistance to vulnerable victims and prosecution witnesses involved with the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2022–23

Notes: Legislation was passed in 2021 to allow canine companions to accompany vulnerable witnesses while they are giving evidence in South Australia’s courts. The Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions has committed to the Canine Court Companion program with Guide Dogs SA/NT until February 2024. Thirty-eight appointments with vulnerable witnesses were attended by the canine companion between April 2020 and February 2021.

Action 28

Continue to work with the Commonwealth Government to reform the Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002.

Status: Ongoing

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The Department for Infrastructure and Transport (DIT) contributes to the National Accessible Transport Taskforce Working Groups and Steering Committee and provides the South Australian contribution to progress legislative reform to modernise the Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002.

Action 29

Ensure the state-owned bus fleet is accessible, including disability awareness training for frontline public transport staff and the consideration of voice systems in buses that notify people of the next stop.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: DIT continues to provide disability awareness training to their frontline staff and provide resources for employees. Additional and more targeted training, including presentations by peak disability organisations, is provided to frontline staff. Customer Care Services incorporate Sighted Guide Training which is facilitated by the Royal Society for the Blind South Australia. A train the trainer program has also been added to the customer service module for the Passenger Service Assistants.

All new buses are fitted with the next stop information system supporting customers with vision impairment to gain greater independence and assurance that they are alighting at the appropriate journey travel points.

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Action 30

Promote liaison and communication links between health services and disability support services, and improve the continuity of supports, including psychosocial supports, during hospitalisation.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2020–23

Notes: The Department for Health and Wellbeing continues to promote the liaison and communication links between systems to ensure South Australians living with disability are supported.

Action 31

Consider establishing minimum standards for priority parks and reserves (including coasts, heritage places and Crown land) that improve access and inclusion for people living with disability and implement a program of priority actions, including exemplar visitor experiences.

Status: In progress

Estimated timeframe: 2021–22

Notes: The Department for Environment and Water has developed an action plan to ensure the continual improvement of accessibility to parks and an Accessibility Guideline is being developed to ensure that all future projects consider access and inclusion.

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Provided by:
Department of Human Services
URL:
https://inclusive.sa.gov.au/resources/inclusive-sa-annual-report/theme-three-accessible-communities
Last Updated:
12 Aug 2020
Printed on:
03 Jul 2022
The Inclusive SA website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia Licence. © Copyright 2016